How long does a land surveying procedure take?

Here you can read more about our processing times, and take part in frequently asked questions and answers.

What happens after I have applied?

When you have submitted your application, you will receive a confirmation and we will check that it contains what is needed. The application is then put on a queue to be allocated to available case managers/teams.

Once your case has been assigned to a case manager, we will contact you. Only then will you receive an estimate of what applies to your specific case. Partly how much it will cost and partly how long it will take.

Read about what it costs, and get an idea of how much you have to pay.

Estimate the processing time for your case

The processing time is counted from the time you submitted your application, until we are completely ready, you have received a decision and the decision has gained legal force.

The processing time includes:

  • Current average queue time.
  • The time it takes to investigate and carry out the land surveying procedure you applied for.
Current average queue time
Priority cases Other matters
About 1 month. About 10 months.

The queue time is updated once a month. Priority cases are an exception. Read more about priority cases in questions and answers on this page.

Average time to investigate and complete a certain land surveying procedure
Land surveying procedure Number of months (approximate)
If you as a private person are going to build residential buildings. 6
To increase or decrease the size of a privately owned property. 6
To develop a commercial or public property. 7
To develop or dismantle agriculture or forestry. 6
To create or change a public business. 11
To develop public infrastructure. 17
To jointly own, care for or alter a community facility. 16

Examples of different types of land surveying procedures.

Questions and answers

Our starting point is to handle applications after the date they came in to us. But we prioritize certain applications to facilitate housing construction and community development.

Examples of priority applications:

  • New construction of residential buildings, industries and office buildings (not extensions or garages).
  • Construction of infrastructure for, for example, lines, roads or railways.
  • Construction of infrastructure for electronic communication, for example broadband via fiber and telemaster.

We always make an assessment as to whether an application should be prioritized or not. It is not something that you as a customer need to judge. If your application is prioritized, it has, among other things, a shorter queue time and is distributed more quickly to our case managers.

Applications for broadband are distributed within a week. New construction of, for example, residential buildings and other priority applications are distributed within approximately one month.

In total, Lantmäteriet handles approximately 14,000 applications for land surveying procedures per year.

The fact that a queue is formed is because the influx of cases exceeds our capacity, workforce.

Unfortunately, for many years now we have had a shortage of Land Surveyors, both at the Land Surveyors and in the labor market in general. They are the ones who have the core competence so that decisions about proceedings can be made. If we could, we would recruit more surveyors, but the competition for them is great.

The need for property formation measures in society is great. The influx of new cases has increased for a few years, but we remain at the same capacity, workforce. This is because we have difficulty recruiting personnel with the right skills.

There is a shortage of land surveyors on the labor market and the competition for them is high. However, we now see a tendency for the influx of cases to decrease.

Another reason for increased queue time is because our teams are now focusing on cases that have not been able to be completed during the pandemic restrictions. Matters that then had to be paused because they require physical meetings. It limits the teams' ability to start handling new cases.

The queue time can vary throughout the year and the current queue time is updated every month.

When you have submitted your application, you will receive a confirmation and we will check that it contains what is needed. The application is then placed in a queue to be distributed to available case managers/teams.

It is only when the case has been allocated that you will be contacted and receive an estimate of what applies to your specific case, partly how much it will cost and partly how long it will take.

How long it then takes to complete the work on your application depends on how easy or difficult it is to implement what you applied for.

Changing a property with the help of a land surveyor is, contrary to what many people think, more than just hammering new pipes into the ground. The work consists of the investigations the Land Survey must make according to law, in order to be able to ascertain who owns what. It is important that it is sustainable over a long period of time.

However, our processing times vary greatly depending on the type of case. For example, there is a big difference between a case that concerns the construction of a railway and affects many land owners along the track, compared to a subdivision of a residential building.

Cases take on average about 12 months, but in reality it can take anything from a few weeks to two and a half years.

Elements included in a land surveying procedure.

  • We coordinate applications nationally to easily transfer cases from one office to another. It also means that we are not as dependent as before on where in the country it is easier or more difficult to recruit.
  • We are broadening recruitment, employing people with backgrounds other than surveyors, for example lawyers, economists, assistants.
  • Through teamwork, we can distribute tasks, work in parallel and use resources more efficiently.
  • The government has added more training places to meet the Land Survey's need for trained surveyors.

The Land Survey is not satisfied with the current situation and is working in a number of areas to improve the processing time. It is in many ways a long-term work.

At the national level, we coordinate applications to easily transfer cases from one office to another. It also means that we are not as dependent as before on where in the country it is easier or more difficult to recruit.

We are broadening recruitment, employing people with backgrounds other than surveyors, for example lawyers, economists and assistants. Through teamwork, we can distribute tasks, work in parallel and use resources in an optimal way.

We are developing a new digital processing support - which part by part takes shape and begins to be used. It provides the opportunity for a better overview, coordination and more efficient handling.

We also work together with other actors to bring about more modern legislation. For example, we start from the Real Estate Education Act, which is from 1970, that is, before the digital revolution.

Contents of this page may be automatically translated, we take no responsibility for the accuracy of the translation. Feel free to contact our customer support centre if you have any questions.

Read more about our website